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20130106
20130114
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Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
important medical and health sciences institutions remain world class. by merging rutgers and umdnj in the north and rowan and umdnj's stratford campus in the south, we will enhance three established hubs of educational excellence in north, south, and central new jersey. and we will bring rutgers, and new jersey medical education, into the 21st century. i thank you for passing this plan, and i was proud to sign it into law this summer. in k-12 education, we have made great strides, but there is much more to be done. who would have thought, just three years ago, in the face of entrenched resistance, that i could stand here and congratulate us today for the following -- ensuring accountability by passing the first major reform of tenure in 100 years, establishing performance-based pay in newark through hard-nosed collective bargaining so that we can reward and retain the very best teachers where we need them most, implementing inter-district school choice, which has tripled its enrollment in the last 3 years and will grow to 6,000 students next year, growing the number of charter scho
to go to on the far side of the unknown that can do the robotic science, can do the mining for the ice crystals and convert that into hydrogen and oxygen, which is fuel. a conference recently in hawaii, i was following a workshop that has been setting up international lunar bases by practicing on the big island of hawaii. you will assemble a large number of large objects. you put the first one down or you expected to land, another one down some distance away -- how do you put them together? do that through a satellite -- motion control. you prove that you can do something like that here in the united states. then we do it at the moon. why my so enthusiastic about that? that is exactly what we want to do at mars. we want to put people on the noon of mars who can then assemble a base that we will then send people. we should assure ourselves that we protect crew members from radiation as much as possible before they ever go somewhere. that is the moon, too. >> a two-part question -- do you believe in extraterrestrial life? >> i hope so. >> are we presumptuous enough to think we are the on
think you have to ask those questions. those are simple questions. it is not rocket science. i used to teach in american university. used to teach courses to cops and prosecutors. this is not rocket science. i don't know if aid should be rocket science. i have been impressed that some people have said we really need a designed program knowing where we are working. if we know we're working in the most corrupt country and the world, we design a program that protects the funding. i was very impressed with that. i have not seen a program with that bill 10. people tell me they are thinking about it. some the -- someone told me the norwegians do that but i have not run into many norwegians. yes, sir? you are norwegian? >> no. one thing i came away with is that the afghans are very good at running their own businesses but what we do as we create an incentive or by running a business is about profits. i have partnered with an afghan and several afghans' over there and we are trying to build infrastructure where afghans have a stake in the infrastructure itself rather than just jobs today an
to the program for international student assessment, the u.s. now ranks 14th in reading. 17th in science, and 25th in mathematics. that is not acceptable. those are not grades we want to put on the national refrigerator. the time for action is now. i want to thank delegate kirk thompson and the chairman of the all student campaign. they have created a number of proposals i will announce this year. it starts with the idea that great students and schools make great citizens. a great teacher, like my sister, makes all the difference in the world in the life of a young person. we need to recruit, retain, and reward excellent teachers, and then treat them like the professionals that they are. [applause] first i am proposing giving teachers their first state- supported pay raise since 2007, and my budget limits provide $58 million for a 2% pay raise. the education fairness act will streamline the bureaucratic grievance procedure to benefit both teachers and principals. we will extend the probationary period from three years to five years and require a satisfactory performance rating, as demonstrated t
of a magazine. "the times" that you read, monday, sports, wednesday, science, dining, thursday, home and style, friday, arts, saturday -- in new york, you get a special sports section, but the rest of the country does not. so what happens? "the times" did very well, in part, because of advertising. we are now in the period of the vietnam war. a lot of advertisers did not want to be on the same page as the vietcong, blood, gore. that is why we started with the normandy invasion. then it was kind to be on the same page because it was us against them. but here we have us against them and us against us. so these special sections that was a great advertising boom, they were short on content sometimes. in my book i used the term "the times" light. what happens, they would dummy down these sections. if you read the sections, sometimes you know, they are extremely prolific, and they have no point. there are some strong articles on alzheimer's and things like that, but there is also some stuff there that is a really soft. but this helped "the times" immeasurably. helped contribute to prosperity. rosend
. senator rockefeller was first elected in 1984 and he is on the commerce, science, and transportation committees. >> thank you, sharon. so incredibly much. a perfect life, by far the most popular rockefeller and west virginia. -- wife, by far, the most popular rockefeller in west virginia. i will get right to them. i have decided not to run again at the conclusion of this term. not now, but in 2014. i hope each of you can understand that this is an entirely personal decision. it is not a political decision and it is not easy. as i approached 50 years of nonstop public service, precluding time with the children and sharon. i consider the ways for travel in life. there are many other ways, and i know deep within me that in 2014, it is the right time for me to recalibrate and find a new balance. i came as an untrained social worker back in 1964. i actually begun my public service for years before that, working for the peace corps and the department of state. frankly, i was in search of a clear and powerful purpose. i wanted something that was so compelling and obsessive that it would fil
. [applause] >> thank you very much, everyone, for coming. thank you to the department of political science. today, we have for pronounced -- we have for pamela spirit we will have a bit of discussion between them and then moved to audience discussion. first, deborah is the this -- is a professor of ethics and society. she is also the senior associate dean for the humanities. she is a member of the philosophy department and director for ethics and a society. her research focuses on the ethical limits of the markets. a place of equality in a just society and a rational choice. she also works on ethics and at the -- in education. she is co-editor of the forthcoming collection, occupy the future. he is a graduate of mit and an early participant in occupy washington -- occupy boston. he specializes in web applications and design. a co-founder in danger of some in cambridge. -- actually, just in central square. if he continues to be engaged in outspoken protests, malfeasance, and a finance industry mismanagement. and next is phil thompson. actually, he is on the end. an associate professor. i'm
you to the department of political science. today, we have for pronounced -- we have for pamela spirit we will have a bit of discussion between them and then moved to audience discussion. first, deborah is the this -- is a professor of ethics and society. she is also the senior associate dean for the humanities. she is a member of the philosophy department and director for ethics and a society. her research focuses on the ethical limits of the markets. a place of equality in a just society and a rational choice. she also works on ethics and at the -- in education. she is co-editor of the forthcoming collection, occupy the future. he is a graduate of mit and an early participant in occupy washington -- occupy boston. he specializes in web applications and design. a co-founder in danger of some -- danger awesome in cambridge. -- actually, just in central square. if he continues to be engaged in outspoken protests, malfeasance, and a finance industry mismanagement. and next is phil thompson. actually, he is on the end. an associate professor. i'm giving their introductions in the order t
and health sciences institutions remain world class. by merging rutgers and umdnj in the north and rowan and umdnj's stratford campus in the south, we will enhance three established hubs of educational excellence in north, south, and central new jersey. and we will bring rutgers, and new jersey medical education, into the 21st century. i thank you for passing this plan, and i was proud to sign it into law this summer. in k-12 education, we have made great strides, but there is much more to be done. who would have thought, just three years ago, in the face of entrenched resistance, that i could stand here and congratulate us today for the following -- ensuring accountability by passing the first major reform of tenure in 100 years, establishing performance-based pay in newark through hard-nosed collective bargaining so that we can reward and retain the very best teachers where we need them most, implementing inter-district school choice, which has tripled its enrollment in the last 3 years and will grow to 6,000 students next year, growing the number of charter schools to a record 86 in n
. it is thoughtful and beautiful. look at an article as a science teacher about the opportunity to bring richard sources to bear. the voice of teachers is the true triumphant voice here. to return to the beltway, let's go to the facts standards. we only assessed reading and mathematics. reading would sometimes narrow. just some stories and fiction. then it would do mathematics. guess what happened to history and the arts? aat's where they asked for balance were kids read richly. there is knowledge of literature in early grades. those are learned. 50% of time in elementary rrowing - we are unnattori the curriculum. a knowledge of science, history, and the arts. that to me is work worth doing. fiction remains the focus of the language arts classroom. i read every shakespeare play. 2 out of 10 require the treatment of the bard. did not fear for "huckleberry finn" and "the great gatsby." the shift is an entry to high- uality literary fiction. these can be treated in class is well.s as as a triumph of the english language. this is the shift in english language arts and one that teachers are finding
, there are a lot of issues surrounding that. in the science areas is where we need to stay focused. whoever the president would like to survive his discretion, that is his call. i would not want to judge where he is going. we would seek to have a collation ship to based policy -- to have a good relationship to base policy. we have been having a good dialogue over the past couple months. we have areas we disagree on. we represent a broader industry that sometimes sees the world differently than a regulator. people the regulation should be thoughtful --we believe regulation should be thoughtful and based in science. >> we welcome the opportunity to work with whoever the president confirms and look forward to continuing the dialogue based on sound science and on tour philosophy or ideology >> thank you all for joining us. happy new year. >> thank you for being here today. thank you very much. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> the new congress is expected to debate the nation's immigration laws. we will talk to fa
science. third, you are going to see us significantly expand the expertise in our law firm, the national chamber litigation center and in other areas of our institution, in order to deal with regulations. our preference is always to work within the legislative and regulatory processes and we do that on a daily basis. but when rights have been trampled on, or regulators have overstepped their bounds, we'll take the necessary legal action. let me turn to immigration reform. america has grown and thrived because we have attracted and welcomed the most talented and the hardest working citizens of the world to our shores. immigrants teach in our universities, invest and invent in our technology companies, staff our hospitals, care for our elderly and young, harvest our food, and serve in our armed forces. given our changing demographics, we need more workers to sustain our economy, support our retired population, and to stay competitive. even with high unemployment, we have millions of job openings that go unfilled. either the workers come here to fill those jobs or the companies take all of
picture arts and sciences, and for us. he's welcome brian rose. rose.ase welcome brian [applause]next, we could not be more honored or delighted to have brooke gladstone with us tonight. she is the cohost of npr's "on the media." it also wrote a very entertaining book called "the influencing machine." we will be doing a signing of her book, it's just came out. she has been at npr for many years. including a three-year stint in moscow where she covered the last years of president boris yeltsin's term. i know that all of you diehard o the media" groupies will tell you that there is something about brooke that pulls you in. ira glass, host of this american life, put it right when he wrote, just like welcome gladwell, michael pollan, and michael lewis, brooke can take any subject, even something you do not give a damn about, and make it of interest. please welcome two-time peabody award winner brooke gladstone. [applause]>> thank you, catherine. thank you, brooke, for coming tonight. i would like to start with your book. you talk about a number of media biases. one of favorites is the narrat
actors guild, the producers guild, the academy of motion picture arts and sciences. please welcome brian rose. [applause] next, but could not be more delighted to have brooke gladstone here tonight. she is the managing editor and co-host of npr's "on the media" and author of a highly acclaimed book "the influencing machine.:" " we will be doing a signing of her book. she has been at npr for many years, including a three-year stint in moscow where she covered the last turbinate years of president yeltsin. i know all of you die hard groupies out there will agree there is something about brooke that pulls you in. each week, even at 7:00 a.m. on saturday, i think i -- the host of this american life put it right when he wrote -- just like malcolm glad well and michael lewis, brooke can take any subject, even something you deny give a dam about, and make a very interesting -- you don't give a damn about, and make it very interesting. please welcome brooke gladstone. [applause] >> thank you for coming tonight. i will like to start with your book. you talk about a number of media bias is. one of
shell for being willing to cooperate on getting to the science. but as i told marvin before we stepped out onstage, in colorado, you know, just repeatedly now, shell has been there calling for stronger regulations of its own industry, agreeing with e.d.f. on how to go forward in a way that really is very meritorious. so i just want to thank you, marvin, for what shell is doing on this topic. [applause] >> you mentioned the -- that there would need to be a mix of energy. you mentioned nuclear. is there a danger that the extraordinary growth of unconventional gas and oil in america creates a sense of abundance and no longer a need to worry about renewables that marvin talked about, and nuclear, for example? >> it's certainly having an impact on investment and research and development, there's no question about it. it has slowed down. we were something like 17 nuclear reactors being considered just to keep us at 20%. nuclear is 20% of our world power mix today and that's backed off. we have four being built in the country. but you see that happening. the thing we have to worry about, agai
in people going into forensic science and that -- that college programs couldn't go fast enough to put people through. he had watched that and realized as the f.b.i., he wanted to make being an f.b.i. agent cool. he was very supportive. >> it was a recruiting vehicle. >> it was a good recruiting vehicle and that was his interest in it. john miller, with ran public affairs with him for a long time and was, i think, like the deputy head, very -- a high-ranking public affairs guy, sort of come out of television, has gone back to television and understood it and there was, even with the best of intentions, there was enormous tension the whole way through. i said, you know, if we're going to do modern television that people are going to watch, it has too much character flaws. there was enormous negotiation over drinking, smoking, sex, what kind of sex, where and when and how and it just, they had the best of intentions, i was very direct with them going in. it's still, i would say that was the best experience. >> ultimately the show didn't work. >> it wasn't quite good enough, wasn't quite
them. host: a food safety attorney at the center for science in the public interest, sarah klein. we're talking about fda proposals for food safety rules. the numbers are there on the screen, along with the center's website. reach out to us via social media, twitter, and facebook. regarding the preventative food- processing part of this, what kind of verifications' is the fda going to lock on to the folks that are processing? guest: enforcement is always a big question for fda. the agency does not have the resources or manpower to do verification and inspection said everett facility. we've got thousands upon thousands of facilities in the u.s. and abroad. fda is looking at ways of involving the states and a cooperative effort. many of these businesses are already inspected by state health departments or state departments of agriculture. fda will bekia collaborative way with the states to ensure that everyone is being inspected, verified, audited up to the same standards. fda will not be on site during all the inspections themselves, as usda is, but it will have a much stronger hand i
in science, and 25th in mathematics. that is not acceptable. those are not grades we want to put on the national refrigerator. the time for action is now. i want to thank delegate kirk thompson and the chairman of the all student campaign. they have created a number of proposals i will announce this year. it starts with the idea that great students and schools make great citizens. a great teacher, like my sister, makes all the difference in the world in the life of a young person. we need to recruit, retain, and reward excellent teachers, and then treat them like the professionals that they are. [applause] first i am proposing giving teachers their first state- supported pay raise since 2007, and my budget limits provide $58 million for a 2% pay raise. the education fairness act will streamline the bureaucratic grievance procedure to benefit both teachers and principals. we will extend the probationary period from three years to five years and require a satisfactory performance rating, as demonstrated through the new performance evaluation system. good teachers will flourish. poo
judges, i think you have to ask those questions. those are simple questions. it is not rocket science. i used to teach in american university. used to teach courses to cops and prosecutors. this is not rocket science. i don't know if aid should be rocket science. i have been impressed that some people have said we really need a designed program knowing where we are working. if we know we're working in the most corrupt country and the world, we design a program that protects the funding. i was very impressed with that. [laughter] i have not seen a program with that bill 10. t in.ild people tell me they are thinking about it. some the -- someone told me the norwegians do that but i have not run into many norwegians. yes, sir? you are norwegian? >> no. one thing i came away with is that the afghans are very good at running their own businesses but what we do as we create an incentive or by running a business is about profits. i have partnered with an afghan and several afghans' over there and we are trying to build infrastructure where afghans have a stake in the infrastructure itself rathe
science monitor" in december of 2008 or so. ncrc proposed doing this and i wrote an article in "new republican" in march of 2010 suggesting that treasury could use tarp funds and act exactly the homeowners loan corporation had done and not do this as a profit but as a way to help homeowners. >> a real quick point on just to clarify my position. i'm not opposed to the in concept the use of eminent domain for borrowers who are upside down, who are current. i'm simply saying that the priority would be in my view for those who are already experiencing financial distress. when you get to those who are current there are other tests that can be put in place. there needs to be a lot more detail on the table before there is a vote of yes or no. for example, if you're paying 70% of your income to keep that mortgage current do you want to force the homeowner to go into default and wreck their credit score and in the process of doing that can't buy clothes, food, etc.? i think there are parameters that can be in place that prioritize in need. in need to me is not just a cutoff between i'm payi
not trust the medicine and science. >> to go to a point he made earlier, that is a process that .akes years, we are at the beginning of a long road. >> apropos something you said, i am not against experimentation. i am actually in favor of it. it is difficult to stabilize it. to take the game marriage example, i totally agree with you. so far the process has worked well. it is also the case we may not get enough time to run actual experiments because, half of the gay rights community -- it does not go fast enough, they are going to jump the gun on this. the problem is not totally similar in the marijuana situation. but i agree with you. you need some states that do not go down that road. you do not want the process to overwhelm the country where states that might be holdout's say, it is not worth the trouble, the enforcement cost is too high, what ever. that is my point. how hard it is to stabilize -- >> nobody is asking for a lot. what has happened on the marriage, which is interesting, although nine states have legalized it, a much larger number of states amended their constitution to for
remain first in science, technology, and energy. that the educate and prepare our young people for the jobs of tomorrow and that when we make it in america, all the people can make it in america. the strength of our democracy also demands that we restore the confidence of the american people in our political process. we must empower the voters and remove obstacles of participation in democracy. [applause] we must increase the level of civility and reduce the role of money in our elections. in [applause] when we do, we will elect more women, more minorities, more young people to public office. [applause] the american people are what make our country great. by and large [applause] -- by and large the united states is a nation of immigrants who share our patriotism and seek the american dream. the strength of our democracy will be advanced by our bold actions on comprehensive immigration reform. [applause] [applause] today we take an oath to protect and defend the constitution, our people, and our freedom. to protect and defend. that is our first responsibility and our democracy r
in university. his numerous books have garnered critical success from the american political science association for the best book in political science. he is also a key facilitator of a facility studies workshop. he has a great deal of experience in the policy field. the senior fellow, he is a former staff member a mark on the national security council and served six years on the national security advisory panel. most recently, he was part of a task force of experts about a new defense strategy for a new era. and a scholar at the american enterprise institute. he has more than three decades of public service and higher education. he was president of the world bank, dean of the johns hopkins school of international studies and assistant secretary of state for east asia. and long served at the pentagon. the great panel to be joined with. i will pose a question to each one of them to kick off the conversation then turn it over to all of you. the first question i want to pose to mike -- what the heck happened on new year's day and even what does it mean for defense? what do you see playing out in t
and seniors living in dignity. after 9/11, it was an extraordinary experience to invest in science, technology, aviation, infrastructure. we put $50 million into the airport. i don't think many people know that, but i am telling you that. making its larger and safer. i can talk about the exhilarating fights as chairman of the committee to make our cause more efficient, and the internet more safe. the internet is a large and a looming problem and has everything to do with cyber security, something we seem not to be able to address in congress. we are leveraging the best in government to help people and solve problems, always keeping at the forefront. that is what we will do in the next two years in the senate. we have the debt ceiling coming up, and i want to be part of that fight. i will pour myself into it because there always is so much importance to be put into it. i have every intention of keeping up this intensity. this is a no-holds-barred approach that i will continue to have to solve problems that affect people's lives. i will never stop working for the people that meant so much to me.
and upcoming spending debate, there are more than 200 science technology, engineering, and math programs in the federal government. 13 agencies spent 3.1 billion per year, and a third of those were added between 2005-2010. to us, that is real waste. maybe the objective is appropriate. the problem for the pentagon is they do a pretty good job defending the country. they did not do a good job of keeping track of where the money has been spent. to say they lost 2.3 trillion means they did not have an audit to show exactly where all of the money is spent. host: to finish up with the fiscal cliff. "washington times" has two headlines -- what are you watching for the next couple of months? guest: i think taxes are off the table. certainly the house will not both more taxes to deal with the sequester, which is all about spending cuts or its deal with the continuing resolution, which is also spending. the last time they held it up in order to get spending cuts, and now we find them delayed. i think they have this -- they have a pretty strong position, and people around the country understand the
. host: should they be highly educated/ should they be skilled in science and math technology? guest: there are conversations about establishing a commission that would have the interest of workers in mind to look at where the economy is requiring workers. the economy doesn't just need engineers. we need to invest in our young people. we need people in the service industry and in other areas. it should complement american workers. they want something that works. let's come up with something that will get the bad employers. host: this is from twitter from jeff. should there be priorities for emigration? guest: does the executive branch have the capacity to regulate immigration? in our view the answer is no. fraud is rampant. it is all political. this has degenerated into a political debate. host: what about the plan about qualified foreign workers? guest: there are millions of americans that need work. temporary or not immigrant visas that are supposed to be for highly skilled workers. employers are reliant on foreign workers for various new applications in growth industries. the long
's health sciences institutions remain world class. by merging rutgers and umdnj in the north and rowan and umdnj's stratford campus in the south, we will enhance three established hubs of educational excellence in north, south, and central new jersey. and we will bring rutgers, and new jersey medical education, into the 21st century. i thank you for passing this plan, and i was proud to sign it into law this summer. in k-12 education, we have made great strides, but there is much more to be done. who would have thought, just three years ago, in the face of entrenched resistance, that i could stand here and congratulate us today for the following -- ensuring accountability by passing the first major reform of tenure in 100 years, establishing performance-based pay in newark through hard- nosed collective bargaining so that we can reward and retain the very best teachers where we need them most, implementing inter-district school choice, which has tripled its enrollment in the last 3 years and will grow to 6,000 students next year, growing the number of charter schools to a record 86 in
important medical and health science institutions remain world-class, by merging rutgers in the north and rowan and campuses in the south. we will enhance 3 tons of educational alexa's an ounce in north, south, and central new jersey. i thank you for passing this plan, and i was proud to sign it into law this summer in camden paid in k-12 education, there is much more to be done. who would have thought three years ago in face of resistance that i could congratulate us today for the following -- insuring accountability by passing the first major reform of tenure in 100 years, establishing performance-based page in new work through collective bargaining so we can reward and retain the very best teachers in the city where we need them the most, implementing inner-district school choice which has tripled its enrollment and will grow to 6000 students next year, growing the number of charter schools to a record of 86 in new jersey, citing the urban hope act to turn failing schools into renaissance schools in newark and trenton and camden, finally, invested the largest amount of state aid to
of everything, medicine, technology, science of every kind. no world war iii. something worked pretty well. they did something else that was particularly important. they built coalitions of common interest. i will come back to that. what they recognize, if we were to avert another 50 years like the world had been through the first of jeers and we were going to have to define relationships not by our differences but by our common interests. only then could we build foundations and mutual trust our mutual common interest in order to deal with the differences. you cannot start with the differences. it is a long time to figure that out. they did have it figured out. i will come back to that. i think it is particularly relevant today. what he said about civilizations was very instructive. he said civilizations' are movements. they're not conditions. they are journeys, and not harbors. he said the civilizations died. he chronicles 24 civilizations that have died. civilizations die from suicide, not for murder. when we think of the world today in the threat to mankind today, we're certainly capab
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)